Jemima Jarvis aims to change the negative connotations of mental health through her sustainable designs. The Heriot Watt University alumna explores the ways mental health can be positively affected and improved through alpine sports, represented through ski heritage. As part of our Global Young Talent in the October issue of Harper’s Bazaar UK, we had the pleasure of speaking with the Scotland based designer, Jemima Jarvis about the importance of mental health and knowing that there is always a tomorrow.

You will soon be graduating from Heriot-Watt University in fashion design, where does your love for fashion stem from?

I believe it’s in my genes, my mum made all her own clothes when she was young. She taught me from a young age how to work with a sewing machine and since then I’ve never looked back. Suffering from dyslexia like many creative people in the industry I relied heavily on visual aids when learning, something the fashion industry helped me to overcome a lot of my problems.
 
 
"Suffering from dyslexia like many creative people in the industry I relied heavily on visual aids when learning, something the fashion industry helped me to overcome a lot of my problems." 




 
What was the main source of inspiration behind your graduate collection?

I feel the word “mental health” comes with such negative connotations while it plays such a vital role in our society. I wanted to use my collection to explore and represent its positive side and how it can be improved. I aimed to show people how to use winter sports as mental boost by representing this through ski heritage and use historical skiwear as inspiration for the silhouettes and fabrics choices. I thoroughly enjoy being able to express how living an alpinist life- style has benefited my mental health and hope to inspire others too.
 
 

 
What sets your collection apart are the unique prints used, could you share your design process with us?

When researching I came across images of old ski clubs and saw how each member wore patches on their jackets almost like a badge of honour. I wanted to explore if I could create my own patch for my collection. I came up with the slogan ‘Lost in the Mountains’ to convey the message of one feeling free and just simply getting lost, not having to stress or overthink and just be at peace. The patch also features a sun rising in the mountains, sending the idea of the sun always rises no matter what. I incorporated this patch through laser etched elements on the outside of the garments as well as vibrant prints on the inside of the garments used as a lining.

"I wanted to use my collection to explore and represent its positive side and how it can be improved. I aimed to show people how to use winter sports as mental boost by representing this through ski heritage and use historical skiwear as inspiration for the silhouettes and fabrics choices."



You champion sustainability with your collection, how does this manifest itself in your final pieces?

I have always loved upcycling, creating something brand new from something old. Once I started this collection, I knew I had to incorporate elements of this into my collection, so I started to look at accessories as a way to feature used skiwear into my collection. Trying to achieve zero waste I created duffle bags and body bags using 100% reused skiwear.

What other plans and dreams do you have for the future?

I hope to have the opportunity to work and collaborate with some on my favourite brands who have made strides in sustainability. I also hope to build my own brand that creates Après wear and ski wear, I have already started selling in the UK under my brand name Ecstaski. Through this platform I am working with the charity SnowCamp who are a non-profit organisation who take youths from disadvantaged backgrounds and giving them opportunities, employability and improved mental health within the skiing world.

"I also hope to build my own brand that creates Après wear and ski wear, I have already started selling in the UK under my brand name Ecstaski."

Discover Jemima Jarvis's full collection




Words by Lupe Baeyens
 
 
 
Top