The eye often plays tricks on us. We usually see what we want to see – our brains way of filtering out all the tiny nuances that would otherwise be too overwhelming. Anson Lau, a Textile Design graduate from Central Saint Martins focuses on these preconceptions and more often than not misconceptions. Taking some wise words from the wise philosopher Aristotle to heart, “our senses can be trusted but they can be easily fooled”, her collection focuses on the disparity between what we see and what actually is.

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Christina’s research topic is concerned with sexual dependency and interdependency between individuals. Many people in big cities like London have the desire to be independent, but at the same time a craving for the intensity that comes from interdependency. The tension this creates seems to be a universal problem. (Nan Goldin)

In order to get visual inspiration she collaborated with Jelly Luise, another CSM student to create a mood film that would support her final collection in terms of colour, shape and structure. Christina provided image-heavy research that was rooted in Nan Goldin’s ‘Ballad of Sexual Dependency’, Schiele drawings and many others.

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Constanca Entrudo’s graduate collection is inspired by the whole idea of performance, circus and transgression. By embracing chaos during the creative process she aimed to generate fabrics that would challenge the usual processes of print making through the use of techniques such as dyeing, bondawebbing, melting different materials, pleating, folding and embossing.

In the first phase of her research she started by looking at Circus archives, London based performers and visited various vintage costume shops, such as Prangsta Costumiers, all over the UK in order to learn more about the materials and fittings that have been used in theatres and burlesque performances.

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Olivia used her abstract photography as the key development when it came to designing her collection. By capturing the uncontrollable reactions triggered during physical and chemical changes she aimed to use her photography to spark a vivid colour palette, pairing pops of citrus tones with translucencies.

Initially inspired by David Mcleod’s 3D digital illustrations that represent movement and fluidity. The synthetic surfaces in Mcleod’s abstract compositions used in the IBM Outthink campaign illustrate the transition between different states of matter such as liquids, solids and gases. The idea of distortion emerges as surfaces combine creating an entrancing visual experience.

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Throughout the years it has become noticeable that culture tends to have an influence on the way individuals experience and perceive life. Paloma has always had a profound admiration for Peru, its culture and its people.

Being bought up in Lima, the capital of Peru, developed her interest and admiration of their architecture and textile manipulation. Their colourful layered houses and diverse historical locations such as Macchu Picchu and Chan Chan provide meaningful illustrations of ancient art.

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Drawing on her initial theme of magic, she expanded to a more abstract approach as her work progressed. Focusing on elements such as transformation, distortion of reality and secret knowledge allowed her to express her research in a more individual way. Graduations in colour, obscured patterns and glitches all contribute to the illusive mood of her designs.

The concept behind her final outcomes were that they were talismanic fabrics, with specific protective elements woven into their design. It was important for her to capture the sense of mystery from her research while creating a collection that was still sophisticated and new.

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