Alexandra Afanasyeva’s graduate men’s jewellery collection is dedicated to polar expeditions. Conceptually the collection evokes the spirit of exploration which is closely linked to such notions as identity and rite of passage.

Climbing gear, survival equipment and various tools including ones from Inuit tribes and those dating back to the Ice Age are the main basis for the collection.

Read more


Many words have been penned about the differences between the East and the West. The list is rather extensive, subcategories under umbrella categories. Emily He, a graduate from London College of Fashion BA Jewellery program, can speak extensively about this subject - a subject that inspired her graduate collection.

Having spent an equal amount of time in both Hong Kong and the UK, Emily’s voice on culture difference, habits and behaviours comes from experience.

Read more


Maria Ivanescu Cotuna’s designs are filled with stereotypical cultural meanings. Each piece is created using dissimilar materials and colours, allowing her to explore enigmatic analogies while designing. She aims to both subdue and regulate desire. The cunningness of the collection is unpredictable and adverse.

Mischief is represented by the tongue, that twirls invitingly, the gesture is sarcastically provocative. The cross stands for pure appropriation yet the association with the tongue defiles the propriety and the sanctity of the religious symbol.

Read more


Inspired by a combination of both manmade and natural settings, such as buildings in the rain, Meiqi’s designs are unique and everything in life can be considered as an inspiration.

Strong characteristics and skilful techniques come together to create an artistic aesthetic, in which the quality and shaping of the metal she uses as a material is a priority in her collections. As well as considering the movement, tiny details are also important when it comes to the qualities of the stainless steel and laser-welder used to combine steel and metal together beautifully.

Read more


Meng takes inspiration from Chinese calligraphy, architectural forms and curves and gestures of the human body. Curves constantly change and form unexpected lines; this tells you a lot about the wearer’s personality. The energy within movement shares the same philosophy and logic as Chinese calligraphy.

Meng connects intangible movement to tangible volume with every stroke. She combines modern elements of architecture shapes to further enhance her designs.

Read more


Qi Wu found inspiration for her collection through quirky, chunky objects from all over the world and was captivated by Kintsugi, an ancient craft skill. On her travels, Qi would buy different items in a variety of countries and would use them to decorate her living spaces. She then decided that if these items can be used to decorate her house then why shouldn’t she use them to decorate herself and give them multiple purposes.

Qi Wu didn’t like the idea of old things becoming abandoned. The potential and fascinating aspects of certain items can be discarded so easily in the rapidly developing modern society that we live in.

Read more


Jewellery is an object that carries more than just an intrinsic significance, for it is not merely an ornament but also a medium for expressing one’s individuality.

In this project, Sara chose to use gallium and bismuth because she believes these two metallic materials possess symbolic attributes that can be employed to reflect the emotional state of the wearer. This is inspired by her obsession with heat, exploring the possibility of using temperature to assess one's emotional state.

Read more


Xiaoqing Liu focused on the relationship between solid and liquid. The texture, structure and colours of the opposite materials reflect a variety of moods, which is what Liu based her collection on.

Liu was inspired by these diverse matters in the world as they exist in every aspect of our day to day lives. In order to understand what they demonstrate to each individual it was important to explore their materiality.

Read more


Inspired by the visual aspect of physical changes that occur with time, Yana’s collection focus on wrinkles and the body’s shape. Her work is based on her personal feelings provoked by the ageing process of her own skin and the anticipation of its future changes.

According to Yana’s research there are two main opinions formed by social norms as well as personal feelings. One of them is positive: age is viewed as something to be proud of, as a testimony of valuable experiences and the visible part of our personality.

Read more