Alvin Lam studied Fashion and Textiles in Hong Kong before moving to the UK to do his masters. London culture heavily inspires Lam, particularly those based around gender. His designs are filling the gap between targeted gender-specific and androgynous apparel. Alvin is redefining industry standards on gender fluidity through his convertible and neutral designs that imply clothing is not personalised to gender. Using playful minimalism and reflecting on issues surrounding subjective character, acceptance and unity his collection is about personality rather than masculinity or femininity.

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After having studied Womenswear in Korea, she took hold of the opportunity to further her creative exploration by placing herself in the heart of London, one of the industry’s key players. Expanding her breadth, Annie took it upon herself to study fashion media, illustration and design before moving into Menswear at the London College of Fashion. She has since gone on to work for ADYN and Nicomede Talavera and continues to thread her conceptual approach to design through her newer collections.

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Emily graduated from Kingston University London in 2017 with a First class degree in Fashion. Her collection focuses on the idea of a strong, masculine identity. Using vintage ice hockey photos as her starting point, she combined details and silhouettes from their uniforms with bold, colourful prints inspired by Salvation Mountain in California. Each piece defines luxury menswear with a youthful, fun twist.

Since completing her graduate collection she has gone on to show at Graduate Fashion week, including being selected to show in the Gala which featured the top 25 students from the whole of Graduate Fashion Week.

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Ericka Santiago studied Fashion Design at the Arts University Bournemouth. Since starting her degree, she took an interest in Unisex Fashion and has continued to push this forward throughout her degree. Ericka is a designer that challenges gender norms and often use colour and print to do this. Inspired by art, society and culture, her designs often reflect social and cultural issues.

Her collection centres on the portrayal of her parents' culture - the Philippines.

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Georgina is an eclectic menswear designer from the farm lands of West Wales. Specialising in mens tailoring while taking a light quirky approach to the traditional. When growing up Georgina was heavily involved with textiles, weaving and knitting. This interest came from her mother. Having these influences around from an early age allowed her passion for design to develop throughout her childhood.

Georgina’s graduate collection was inspired by a variation of artists but her main focus was taking distorted elements and turning them into energetic, colourful pieces within men’s tailoring through a mix of knit and fur.

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James Reeves’ work explores a masculine identity through military references, juxtaposed and spliced with sequin. In combination with print and colour, he aimed to challenge the lack of such things within menswear.

James reflected on his own wardrobe and at school uniforms, how these two ideas of subconscious and enforced conformity dictated men’s dress. Bright colours and prints made little to no appearance and this informed the direction of his collection.

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Monika Juaneikaite's professional tailoring and design skills allowed her to create a collection, which translates a minimal and sophisticated feel. Monica was heavily inspired by gender. She asked herself what does it mean to be a women or a man? A lot of influence came from the history of transgender males and females. She looked into a range of different centuries and cultures, which in turn allowed her to develop a new take on traditional menswear tailoring.

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Using a combination of traditional Chinese and Japanese wear with elements of modern European garments, Melanie’s collection focuses on using origami shapes and tailoring techniques to create a gender-neutral collection.

Flowers were the motif of the collection. Using different folding techniques, Melanie applied this to her garment to create volume and three-dimensional shapes, focusing the drama on the top half of the body. In contrast, clean lines and refined tailoring were used on the bottom half, a happy medium between tradition and modernity, simple and decorative.

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Peng Yu Wang’s disciplinary education and working background helped him to successfully create a remarkable graduate collection. Inspired by the way insects are constantly renovating and breaking their own inherent patterns in order to become brand new, vivacious and beautiful beings, Peng Yu focused on breaking original lifestyles when it came to creating his collection.

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A Menswear Design graduate from the London College of Fashion, Steve Jin decided to find inspiration for his first collection through introspection and opposition. As a minimalist with high standards of cleanliness, Steve wanted to incorporate these personal aspects.

At the same time, he wanted to create tension and found himself fascinated by the festivalgoers of Woodstock – their fluid motions and carefree nature. Marrying these two seemingly contradictory ideas together, he coloured his garments with hand embroidered flowers and softer lines on a delicate palette. The collection made use of fusing together and modernising traditional draping and tailoring techniques.

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Birmingham City graduate, Thomas Cox travelled around New York and London in order to further develop his creative self. Whilst in New York, he visited an exhibition called The Out and Bad Series at The Museum of Art and Design where he saw a piece called Swag Swag Krew, which consisted of a group of very masculine mannequins in masculine poses, juxtaposed with flamboyantly feminine outfits.

Thomas then went on to consider why was it that homosexual men are not considered masculine, strong or intimidating in society like a gang would be.

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Xiao Zhu Chen’s first collection took inspiration from Pollock’s Toy Museum, a quaint yet historical venue showcasing traditional and contemporary toys. Transforming nostalgia into her designs, garments were covered in childlike scribbles and one-off prints that mimicked a child playing in the midst of their many toys.

Using specialised cutting and draping techniques, each outfit paid homage to Xiao Zhu’s fond childhood memories. Bold and vivid colours accompanied a mélange of textures and LEGO building blocks made their debut in the form of accessories.

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Nigerian designer, Yingi Goma’s graduate menswear collection draws inspirations from a street vendor in Nigeria. By viewing the African country with a third eye, she captures her Lagos car ride experience, the lifestyle and environment.

There is a mix of unusual garment fabrics such as tech net, plastic and hessian; shapes and oversized silhouettes. Draw cords passed through button holes, Detachable bags and draw string sack-like shapes that reference items street hawkers carry on their body. The use of embroidery and print for text reference is a key aspect that brings curiosity to the collection.

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Inspired by tailoring and corsetry history, Zexi Yu is quite literally a menswear fairy tale come true. She translated her otherworldly, risqué attitude into garments filled with intricate silhouettes, dutch satin and effeminate detailing.

Yu augmented her garments through elaborate lining and shoulder pad silhouettes. This allowed her to fashion ingenius designs that were further heightened through adept tailoring. The effeminate colours and idea of lingerie allowed her to reinvent menswear in a more open minded way.

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