DESIGN PROCESS

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ABIGAIL GREWAL

Abigail Grewal’s collection was inspired by her childhood love for creating light movement using sparklers. What began as playful experimentation evolved into a more intentional creative process as she grew up and began to use the shutter speed function on her camera to create beautiful light movement photographs. The photographs influenced the print design in this collection.



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ABIGAIL SKRENTNY

The starting point for Abigail’s graduate collection was The Florida Project Film. It gives an insight into an American Childhood with resiliency and freedom through being yourself.

The imagery informed the collection’s mood and colour story. The film led to research into American suburban life including 1970s suburbia and 1930s depression era. Stephen Shore’s imagery from a road trip in 1970s America was a key piece of inspiration.

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ACENTE

Designer, Dayun Lee’s, creativity comes from her interests. Before starting the concept, she usually researches art movements and historical visuals of the women at the beginning. These could be from the book, movie or art. She found that women in the past and present give her interesting point of views as a womenswear designer.

For example, 1930s representation of female bodies was interesting topic that she wanted to observe. She loves how it depicts in various ways.

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ADIAM ELIAS

The SS/19 collection is inspired by Body Modification, body modification transcends any cultural boundaries. During the process of my design development I Looked at both the primitive and modern primitive practises in a contemporary society were consumer culture uses the Body as a representation as well as a display of a source of identity.

“Bodies are sites of representation, are not only physical but communicative” (Atkinson, 1971)

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ALEXANDRA AFANASYEVA

Alexandra Afanasyeva’s graduate men’s jewellery collection is dedicated to polar expeditions. Conceptually the collection evokes the spirit of exploration which is closely linked to such notions as identity and rite of passage.

Climbing gear, survival equipment and various tools including ones from Inuit tribes and those dating back to the Ice Age are the main basis for the collection.

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ALEXANDRA ANDERSON

@KNITWEARBYALEXANDRA worked in collaboration with embroiderer Amelia Skarpellis to create a new generation of punk. Together, they wanted to celebrate advancements within the textile industry and create a collection that appreciates the scope of possibilities that fun and vibrant textiles brings to today’s fashion industry. Their aim: to develop a new wave of punk – just as rebellious, embracing colour and unmasking societies playful side.

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ALEXANDRA LARRABURE

Material Memories explores the construction of memory and identity in relation to materiality, through a collage-like autobiographical narrative. The collection delves into family memories and temporalities, engaging in an ongoing process of defamiliarization and refamiliarization which understands memory as a construction based on ever-changing patterns and textures.


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ALI AKBARI

Bacha posh means ”dressed as boy” in dari. In Afghan culture, boys are considered to be worth more than girls. If there are only daughters in a family, the parents can choose one of them and make her into a bacha posh. A bacha posh is a make-believe son, a girl that for a period of time takes on the role as a boy in the family."

Bacha posh is not only about girls being dressed as boys – it is about women’s situation in Afghanistan. I grew up with my grandmother, and I have seen what it looks like. Dressed as a boy, the girl has more freedom. The clothes thus become a vehicle to expanded freedom.

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ALICE CALLUM

Alice Callum’s graduate collection, ‘BLOSSOM AFTER MIDNIGHT’, explores the concept of how the body can become an artistic medium through the essence of performance both on stage and in the street. For years the body has been used as a medium to translate the essence of art through performance. Focusing primarily on 20th century performance, she explored a variety of performances from the Ballet Russes and the works of Leon Bakst to Marchesa Casati to late 20th Century performers such as Leigh Bowery, Bowie, Lindsay Kemp and the rise of club and drag cultures.

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ALICE HENFREY

Alice’s collection was inspired by historical sportswear silhouettes from her dad’s personal Olympic magazine collection. From these she established large billowing shapes in contrast to tight restrictive bodies, this became the foundation silhouette throughout each of her designs.

Alice enhanced this silhouette through 3D development, using personal swimsuits ranging from different periods in her competitive swimming background.

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ALICE PONS

Alice Pons’ graduate collection, ‘NEVERLAND’, was inspired by a long lost picture, found hidden amongst childhood belongings. A five-year-old Alice, wearing her father’s black suit, beams unknowingly into the camera whilst unconsciously playing with the lapels of the jacket.

The photo communicates the innocence of youth, and the pure joy that can be derived from wearing a garment when unburdened from the self-consciousness of the adult world. This snapshot of youthful naivety has inspired this collection, which looks to recreate the blissful ignorance of a child unaware of the meaning of fashion.

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ALVIN LAM

Focusing on the body and movement, particularly within dance was a major influence when it came to Alvin Lam’s first collection. By looking into the history of dance and seeing how it has progressed through the ages allowed him to understand how the art is connected to romance and sensuality.

After interviewing dancers Alvin learnt how important the waist and the legs are, predominantly within ballet. Focusing on the muscles in these two areas allowed him to create designs that enhance the beauty of these.

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AMBER KIM

Amber Kim’s collection is inspired by her attraction to fun, exciting and carefree experience. However, her personal experience of music festivals demonstrated the negative impact on the environment that the entertainment and creative process can cause.

She has used sustainable thinking, skills, and creativity to address the environmental issues that harm the ecosystem. Her sustainable approach was applied throughout the whole process. Every stage of the process should be resourceful, responsible and retractable.

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AMBER MAY

Amber May’s graduate collection was inspired by bodily kinaesthetic intelligence. The ability to construct physical objects which evolve through the repetitive hand movement fascinated her. Led by the creativity of ‘Hands’, she explored physical evidence of this whilst travelling in Bangkok, Thailand. Captivated by architectural patterns and hand crafted applique tiled surfaces, it was an immediate source of inspiration for the collection.

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AMY MCCANN

Amy McCann’s collection was inspired by her dissertation, covering the issues behind the female form in the sense of how accessible plastic surgery is in the postmodern world. She explored the manipulation of the female form to encourage the 3-Dimensional design which can be seen within the development of her final collection, following a route of artistic and conventional design using mannequins to work on the stand and drape materials in order to grow the research she produced.

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AMY THOMSON

Merging fashion and illustration, Amy’s collection tells a narrative through surface pattern elements that can be interpreted and told in multiple different ways dependent on the interpreter. Responding to this by using a personal illustrative style to create stories within the garments based upon a primary research project creating a narrative based upon views of beauty; questioning what beauty can be defined as and how stereo types can effect perceptions in society, challenging and encouraging difference.

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ANNA LOWE

Anna Lowe’s collection was inspired heavily by female fighters and protectors from the past and present, whilst including family references. During the summer she visited the Women’s library, Museum of London and the Imperial War Museum for initial research, and went through family photos. Structured uniforms, pleated skirts, draping and volume were all key links she found between her various points of research. This inspired Lowe to create a womenswear collection exploring tailoring and draping to create empowering garments.

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ANNA SCHUSTER

This collection is not inspired by trends and aesthetics. This collection is inspired by people and materials to shift the focus towards a more conscious fashion identity. The design process demands creativity and strategic thinking of fashion designer who are trained to focus on aesthetics. They have an essential role and their power of decision-making need to support a sustainable future. Collaborating across disciplines challenges designer to think beyond the fashion design process as we know it. This collection is based on three diverse collaborations which discover a variety of pathways that lead to garments with value and quality.

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ANNE MARIE K

Anne Marie K’s collection revolves around a journey down the Nile taken by a woman in the 1940’s. As she travels through an almost ”Timeless” Egypt. Each statement piece tells a story. The colours used in the garments are derived from the scenery in Egypt; a lot of blues, greens, and beiges and mustardy oranges.

The materials used encompass Egyptian ”dying art”, including Tulle bel Telli, Tent-making, glass-blowing, Sadaf Jewelry boxes technique, fishing nets, and more. Anne Marie K chose to use these particular methods to help the women’s position in the Egyptian society and break extremist social norms.

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ANNIE EUNBYEOL CHOI

Having spent her time in the halls of London’s elite fashion schools and surrounding herself with industry peers, Annie began to notice a stark similarity. Black has circulated saliently, a modest staple in wardrobes and central piece to many designers’ collections. She poses the question, how many black items do you have in your wardrobe?

Her research then started off with two simple queries: What is black? Why do people love wearing black?

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ANSON LAU

The eye often plays tricks on us. We usually see what we want to see – our brains way of filtering out all the tiny nuances that would otherwise be too overwhelming. Anson Lau, a Textile Design graduate from Central Saint Martins focuses on these preconceptions and more often than not misconceptions. Taking some wise words from the wise philosopher Aristotle to heart, “our senses can be trusted but they can be easily fooled”, her collection focuses on the disparity between what we see and what actually is.

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ATELIER JEN

Atelier Jen focuses on creating bespoke statement pieces that are colourful, decorative and highly detailed. Made from layers of durable paper, securely glued together, then decorated with gold and silver leaf overlayed with an array of pattern and colour. When finished they are coated in waterproof varnish.

The fundamental step is choosing the background papers, hand painted textures with gold, silver or copper leaf designs are prepared meticulously. The paper and template are then merged by cutting and gluing together layers of paper to achieve the required thickness.

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AYSE DAGA

Ayşe’s collection is mainly inspired by the mystical relationship between objects and humans. Besides her passion for collecting materials, she is also interested in the construction of cabinet of curiosities, the human subconscious, memory and the psychological phenomena called Pareidolia. Her aim was to create a dream-like narrative constructed with different objects each having a personified character inspired by history and mythology. Her collection is a representation of each character through the expression of their faces and eyes.

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BECKY HONG

“ Fragility “

{ The quality of being easily broken or damaged. }

We are standing in reality, we are existing in this world filled with imperfections and impermanent.

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BEICHEN GUAN

Beichen Guan’s collection is inspired by the star pattern emoji that people easily can understand, transformed into teeth whitening products and tools. The collection is a entertaining way to show people just like her, who try so hard to whiten their teeth because of aesthetic pressures from society.

The human tooth has evolved since the ancient age. Dental development in the modern world is a milestone that every person has to undergo in child development. But in the contemporary consumer culture, dental treatment has always been “cosmetic”, concerned with aesthetics as much as function.

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BEN STEPHEN FORD

Ben Stephen Ford’s graduate collection is inspired by the concept of wanting to ‘fix it’ or ‘put it right’, playing with the impulse of those who can’t stop that internal need for perfection.

The idea can be best described as a crooked hanging frame, some would see the fault from a distance away, however some may just walk past it. It is those who have to fix the problem who are the ones that are being captured in the collection.

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BERENIKE CORCUERA

Berenike Corcuera’s collection was inspired by kirilian photographs of her aura, first captured in Chinatown’s reowned Magic Jewelry when she lived in New York in 2014. She began studying the electromagnetic field of the human body to understand how to translate the invisible. She began the practice of mandala and colour studies, to understand how metaphysical bodies could be interpreted into physical bodies and contemporary menswear clothing.

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BETHAN CURRIE

Colour and labour intensive textile techniques are the key aspects of Bethan's creations, as well as personal and meaningful narratives. She designs for a woman who is feminine, fearless and with a sense of humour.

Drawing on her interests in retro aesthetics and interiors, Bethan’s final collection, “NUKE KID ON THE BLOCK”, began with a hunt to find 1970s bathrooms full of vibrant colour and intricate textures. Her own Grandma’s bubble-gum pink en-suite proved one of the most intriguing, with it’s floral tiles and bulb shaped taps, that later went on to inform silhouette and print.

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BETHANY HILTON

Meaningful movement, Natural habits, And Intuitive behaviour. Derived from the German term, meaning a longing to travel to a place where you feel at home, Bethany’s debut Graduate collection ‘Heimweh’ looks at traditional nomadic qualities in a contrast to a modern society.

Exploring the time-honoured lifestyle, the pulls of life and a new evolution of nomads, driving the urge to re-nature and trust our instinct in, the tech driven world of today. As part of the nomadic art movement, Joseph Beuys aids Bethany’s research in understanding the connection of the nomad and the natural world.

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BHAVINI RAINDI

The 1920s Flappers were heavily featured in ‘The Great Gatsby’ and were important in deciding the silhouette and fabrics. The 1920s Gangsters gave the structure needed to the soft and flowing silhouette of the Flappers. The staple item worn by this subculture was a tailored jacket/suit, this was manipulated to create some interesting shapes. The lapel of a jacket became a key design feature. The jacket lapel was changed in size and position on the garment, in response to imagery from the Ocean Liner exhibition.

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BOBBY CAMPBELL

Walking the streets of India, viewing an extraordinary range of Temples and Mosques, featuring delicate pastel shades and inspiring pigmented blocks of colour. Pure cotton displaying a range of extravagant hand-dyed fabrics, layered by screen-printed patterns inspired by India’s most amazing landmarks. The luxurious, yet wild silhouettes may be spotted en-route to Lakme Fashion Week.

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BOYANG JIANG

The utilitarian function of clothing is to house the human body, a body that is always in constant motion. Bo Yang Jiang's collection is an interpretation of this relationship. She dissects the prime functions of what clothing does, on one hand it satisfies the practical demands and on the other, its a manifestation of character.

For her MA Fashion graduate collection at Kingston University, BoYang turned to contemporary dance for inspiration. She looked into female contemporary dancers and choreographers such as Silvia Gribaudi, who is know for her work in body politics through dance.

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BRYAN WAN

“When your world is collapsing, when everything is closing in, what you want is to be somewhere else, somewhere you can breathe in peace, a scrap of beauty, far from the noise and ugliness but, if there is no escape then you go there in your dreams and you paint that landscape into existence.”

Bryan Wan’s collection was aiming to express the concept through his pattern cutting and designing processes, inspired by his initial inspiration which is trying to translate the elegant and simple lines and the shapes and spaces of traditional Chinese hand made Ming furnitures and ceramics.

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CAROLINE PERINO

Although Caroline Perino’s collection is clearly inspired by art and painting, firstly it found inspiration in the kinetic sculpture field and the movement of machines. The process started by researching pictures that brought inspiration to the designer, and by doing so she realised most of the pictures were sculptures with complex forms or paintings with many elements and objects spread on the canvas. Some of her inspirations included art work made by Alexander Calder, Miró, Picasso and Kandinsky.

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CAT O'BRIEN

Cat O’Brien’s graduate collection; Cat’s Coven has come from a culmination of personal interests and concerns regarding women and power, combined with the whimsical twist in a love of all things Halloween. What began as a more serious observation of the emergence of Mesmerism, Spiritualism, and Science in 19th Century Britain, and the links to Witches and women in particular, the mood of the collection plays on a lot of the tropes associated with Witches and promiscuity, creating an overall aesthetic from the parody that is both dark and Campy at once.

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CECILY OPHELIA

‘Etaka’ is Cecily’s projection of beauty amongst apocalyptic visions of a destroyed landscape. Situated in this “AWAY” place, somewhere between the utopian and dystopian wreckages of postmodernity. Considering her own place in the creative renewal of this catastrophe, her collection follows certain principles of wabi sabi, in that it is made primarily from recycled and natural materials “whose devolution is expressive and attractive.” (Andew Juniper-Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence).It is also for this reason I have placed emphasis on the handmade. Valuing the process of time serves both as a therapy and a protest against the voracious cycle of the fashion treadmill, which weaves obsolescence into the very fabric of its garments.

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CHLOE NEZIANYA

Chloe Nezianya’s collection was heavily inspired by historical and mythological imagery and representations of Amazonian goddesses. Chloe drew comparisons between the big statuesque women depicted in the imagery to the plus-size women that she aimed to dress. The statues boasted soft drapes and fluid movement, with fabrics loosely hanging over the body. These garments inspired Chloe to find more deliberate ways to use drape in her work.

In an effort to combine luxury with comfort and ease, Chloe found that the properties of powermesh were the most effective to use as both the base of a garment and to use as a drape. The fabric has the most forgiving stretch and ease which gives the person wearing it more confidence in their movement. Using mesh was also the perfect fabric to make considered drapes and ruching inspired by her research.

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CLEO DE LAET

Looking into history, Japanese and Indian culture, Cleo finds new ways to create drapes, to play with pattern constructions, proportions and colours.

For her first collection “Cibachromes”, the designer was inspired by a few still life photographs by the American photographer Sally Mann. 'Cibachromes' refers to the manual photo-printing technique in which colours overlap. Bright, pure and expressive, the key words of the sustainable fashion label Cleo De Laet.

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CÉLINE MARIE

The AW18 debut collection HUMAN MECHANOIDS has been inspired by Swiss surrealist painter HR Giger and his idea of the biome- chanoid and explores the physical relationship between digital technology and the human body. The partially controversially perceived imagery created by the artists’ depiction of reality at the time suggests that we are inevitably transformed into a kind of human machinery. Placing his idea into modern context leads to the idea of viewing social media as an extension of ourselves due to constant engagement.

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CHAERIN LEE

Chaerin Lee fuses the silhouettes of 1980's sportswear, the expressionism of renowned artist Jackson Pollock and the vibrant colours of Leigh Bowery's make-up and costumes. With these inspirations at the forefront of Chaerin's mind, she set out to create a collection that could have a positive impact on human emotion using Colour Theory.

Knowing that people in busy modern societies often suffer from fatigue, Chaerin Lee developed energetic prints and patterns inspired by the expressive movement seen in the work of American artist Jackson Pollock. She tested these colourful yet subtle prints on different fabrics, familiarising herself with the nuances in the results.

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CHARLOTTE MOORE

Charlotte’s collection California Dreamin was inspired by the beautifully accessible Salvation Mountain which is based in California where people from all around the world go to worship anything and everything they wish to. Charlotte created this collection using her own strong handdrawn prints with cultured silhouettes. She also gained a massive LOVE for embroidery design inspired by converting everyone to see the world in the way others do.

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CHARLOTTE THOMPSON

Charlotte Emma Thompson’s collection portrays a feminine, dreamy atmospheric portfolio that shows the story of her collection, the individual inspiration and design process for each piece.

The concept of her graduate jewellery collection ‘Babygirl’ is a celebration of the strength in sisterhood. In a current world of strong male politics culture her project embodies femininity and girlhood with strength. The main inspiration/concept came purely from icons such as Chloe Sevigny, Tavi Gevinson and Solange. Along with Sofia Coppola’s film: The Virgin Suicides and Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s film: Mustang.

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CHRISTINA SEEWALD

Christina’s research topic is concerned with sexual dependency and interdependency between individuals. Many people in big cities like London have the desire to be independent, but at the same time a craving for the intensity that comes from interdependency. The tension this creates seems to be a universal problem. (Nan Goldin)

In order to get visual inspiration she collaborated with Jelly Luise, another CSM student to create a mood film that would support her final collection in terms of colour, shape and structure. Christina provided image-heavy research that was rooted in Nan Goldin’s ‘Ballad of Sexual Dependency’, Schiele drawings and many others.

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CLAIRE TAGG

Claire Tagg uses detailed print work in an illustrative style based on narrative to design her pieces. Her inspiration derives from travel and photography but mainly from her previous occupation as an air stewardess.

Claire created remarkable illustrations by drawing in a mixed media style in different scales to create motifs. She would then use Photoshop to allow her to digitally print onto her garments through a mixture of digital and screen printing.

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CONSTANCA ENTRUDO

Constanca Entrudo’s graduate collection is inspired by the whole idea of performance, circus and transgression. By embracing chaos during the creative process she aimed to generate fabrics that would challenge the usual processes of print making through the use of techniques such as dyeing, bondawebbing, melting different materials, pleating, folding and embossing.

In the first phase of her research she looked at Circus archives, London based performers and visited various vintage costume shops all over the UK in order to learn more about the materials and fittings that have been used in theatres and burlesque performances.

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DAOYUAN DING

Daoyuan Ding’s collection was initiated by the study of the artist Alicja Kwade’s artworks and influencing surrealist artworks. Also based on the philosophy, Object Oriented Ontology, Ding started to see objects by different statuses.

For example, a wooden stool can be seen as a tree which would be the raw material of the stool in the future and the wooden pieces which was the work in progress when manufacturing the wooden stool.

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DESREE AKORAHSON

Desree Akorahson conducted her primary research by visiting Kew Gardens and drawing and collection information about the rarity of the flowers. She wanted to create a hand rendered, botanical look about her prints, which is why she chose to draw her prints by hand using fine liners and using Photoshop to add in the colours. By using this technique, she was able to enhance the brightness in all of the colours chosen.

Desree was inspired by artists such as Bridget Riley and William Morris when it came to creating her prints. She combined these two styles and added in some influences from 60s fashion.

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DINA FUSI


Attention at the core to these craft techniques gives a sense of childlike play through tactile experimentation and draws consumers into a rich and unique tangible experience with the brand.

The attention to craft processes is complemented throughout the collection by the use of modern digital techniques, including laser cutting and computer embroidery, allowing for more experimental and unique results.

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EDEN KESHIA

Eden Keshia’s graduate collection is inspired by the curiously beautiful artworks created during early infancy. The erratic brush-strokes and experimental nature of the paintings and scribbles prove to be an interesting starting point for colourful prints and hand-painted designs.

Always adorned with hand-rendered intricacies, designs feature hand-painted details, bespoke embroidery and tactile embellishments, intended to appeal to all senses. The ethos of this collection embraces the concept of a slower-paced fashion; the design process focuses on creating high-quality wearable art pieces which can be kept and treasured.

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EDWIN CHARMAIN

With a narrative that stems from the journey of Indonesian batik to the heart of its modern society, Charmain's jewellery collection explores the evolution of Indonesian batik through history in terms of technique, pattern, production and consumption.

He gives a new life into the thousand years tradition by transforming what once a two-dimensional waxing technique on top of fabric into a three-dimensional jewellery object, emphasising on the sustainability and survivability aspect of Indonesia handcrafted batik in this machine production era.

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ELENA KURGINYAN

A starting point for Elena’s collection was a film “The Colour of Pomegranates” as cinematography takes a big part in her research and design developmentt. One of the key points of both of her concept and designs started after reading a book by Hamid Naficy “An Accented Cinema”. Elena’s thinking process and the narrative of the project has been influenced by numerous personal feelings such as memory, nostalgia, family and relationships between people.

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ELIN HOLM

Illustrations are the most important step in the development of the NILEMLOH collections. As the colours and prints are directly put onto the garments once finished, there’s only one chance to reach the desired result. Therefore, the illustrations give the designer the opportunity to plan ahead and visualize the final result of each piece in relation to another. The Printograms collection which is the first complete collection utilizing this technique is a mash-up of luxurious vintage, romantic lace, muddy colour tones and a touch of rough rave aesthetics.

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ELISHA CORINNE

Elisha Corinne’s debut collection titled ‘The Lost Boys’ came from her interests into travel and exploration of new places. Shackleton’s famous Antarctic voyage first inspired this story with influence from the equipment, clothing and surrounding environments.

During the design development process Elisha wanted to distort the normal shapes and silhouettes of garments. Enlarging and folding trousers and classic shirts then pairing these with fisherman inspired silhouettes creating a well-considered collection.

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ELLIS MHAIRI CAMERON

O R I G I N S

Ellis’ latest collection, Origins, takes inspiration from the jewellery hoards which have been found across Scotland, containing pieces which transcend the centuries and encompass the heritage of many different lands.

Origins takes qualities from these hoards; a myriad of coins and jewels, fragments of history, pollinated from different areas. Sculpted in 14 carat yellow gold and set with diamonds, the Origins collection is a fusion of intricacy and erosion. Historical shapes are deconstructed into sculptural fine jewellery situated firmly within today’s modern world.

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EMILY CLARK

Emily began designing womenswear because, as a young girl, the idea of designing for men simply never occurred to her. It wasn't until her second year at Kingston University that a tutor assumed her clothes were for men, when all of a sudden the penny dropped. Ever since she has been obsessed with Mens clothing, from tailoring and formalwear to sportswear and RTW.

When studying abroad in Asia Emily became extremely aware of the stark differences between male friendships in the East compared to that of the West, and began to question the social construct of masculinity.

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EMILY HE

Many words have been penned about the differences between the East and the West. The list is rather extensive, subcategories under umbrella categories. Emily He, a graduate from London College of Fashion BA Jewellery program, can speak extensively about this subject - a subject that inspired her graduate collection.

Having spent an equal amount of time in both Hong Kong and the UK, Emily’s voice on culture difference, habits and behaviours comes from experience.

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ERICKA SANTIAGO

Islanders is a project that celebrates the lives of the people in the Philippines -Ericka’s place of birth. She wanted to portray the happy and colourful lives of the people that inhabit the Islands. She was particularly fascinated by the mode of transport that is widely used in the country - The Jeepneys. They are known for their crowded seating and decorations which have become a symbol of the Philippine culture and Art.

As someone who did not grow up in the Philippines, her view of the country is different to those that have lived their whole lives there. To the Islanders, the jeepney is a vehicle to get to work, school and home. To Ericka, it is a special reminder of the diverse culture that she is a part of.

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ESPIEGLE

A variety of strange shapes and colourful, innovative materials can be seen throughout Xin Wen’s series of works. She incorporates different cuttings and colours that have a diverse chemical effect to enhance the wearer’s character.

She is inspired by fairytales, nature and life and uses a range of different techniques such as silkscreen printing, laser cutting and embroidery to create her designs.Each piece of work is handmade, allowing them to be completely unique.

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FIELDS OF GOLD

The making behind the beautiful shoes.

Fields of Gold artisanal shoes are born out of passion for travel. Turning local authentic handcrafts into fashion masterpieces. Fields of Gold represents unique eastern motives, combining tradition and innovation. Each pair are completely unique, with over 30 hours of hand embroidery followed by strict quality control.

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