DESIGN PROCESS

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ABIGAIL SKRENTNY

The starting point for Abigail’s graduate collection was The Florida Project Film. It gives an insight into an American Childhood with resiliency and freedom through being yourself.

The imagery informed the collection’s mood and colour story. The film led to research into American suburban life including 1970s suburbia and 1930s depression era. Stephen Shore’s imagery from a road trip in 1970s America was a key piece of inspiration.

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ALEXANDRA AFANASYEVA

Alexandra Afanasyeva’s graduate men’s jewellery collection is dedicated to polar expeditions. Conceptually the collection evokes the spirit of exploration which is closely linked to such notions as identity and rite of passage.

Climbing gear, survival equipment and various tools including ones from Inuit tribes and those dating back to the Ice Age are the main basis for the collection.

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AALEXANDRA ANDERSON

@KNITWEARBYALEXANDRA worked in collaboration with embroiderer Amelia Skarpellis to create a new generation of punk. Together, they wanted to celebrate advancements within the textile industry and create a collection that appreciates the scope of possibilities that fun and vibrant textiles brings to today’s fashion industry. Their aim: to develop a new wave of punk – just as rebellious, embracing colour and unmasking societies playful side.

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ALICE CALLUM

Alice Callum’s graduate collection, ‘BLOSSOM AFTER MIDNIGHT’, explores the concept of how the body can become an artistic medium through the essence of performance both on stage and in the street. For years the body has been used as a medium to translate the essence of art through performance. Focusing primarily on 20th century performance, she explored a variety of performances from the Ballet Russes and the works of Leon Bakst to Marchesa Casati to late 20th Century performers such as Leigh Bowery, Bowie, Lindsay Kemp and the rise of club and drag cultures.

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ALICE HENFREY

Alice’s collection was inspired by historical sportswear silhouettes from her dad’s personal Olympic magazine collection. From these she established large billowing shapes in contrast to tight restrictive bodies, this became the foundation silhouette throughout each of her designs.

Alice enhanced this silhouette through 3D development, using personal swimsuits ranging from different periods in her competitive swimming background.

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ALVIN LAM

Focusing on the body and movement, particularly within dance was a major influence when it came to Alvin Lam’s first collection. By looking into the history of dance and seeing how it has progressed through the ages allowed him to understand how the art is connected to romance and sensuality.

After interviewing dancers Alvin learnt how important the waist and the legs are, predominantly within ballet. Focusing on the muscles in these two areas allowed him to create designs that enhance the beauty of these.

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AMY THOMSON

Merging fashion and illustration, Amy’s collection tells a narrative through surface pattern elements that can be interpreted and told in multiple different ways dependent on the interpreter. Responding to this by using a personal illustrative style to create stories within the garments based upon a primary research project creating a narrative based upon views of beauty; questioning what beauty can be defined as and how stereo types can effect perceptions in society, challenging and encouraging difference.

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AMBER MAY

Amber May’s graduate collection was inspired by bodily kinaesthetic intelligence. The ability to construct physical objects which evolve through the repetitive hand movement fascinated her. Led by the creativity of ‘Hands’, she explored physical evidence of this whilst travelling in Bangkok, Thailand. Captivated by architectural patterns and hand crafted applique tiled surfaces, it was an immediate source of inspiration for the collection.

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ANNE MARIE K

Anne Marie K’s collection revolves around a journey down the Nile taken by a woman in the 1940’s. As she travels through an almost ”Timeless” Egypt. Each statement piece tells a story. The colours used in the garments are derived from the scenery in Egypt; a lot of blues, greens, and beiges and mustardy oranges.

The materials used encompass Egyptian ”dying art”, including Tulle bel Telli, Tent-making, glass-blowing, Sadaf Jewelry boxes technique, fishing nets, and more. Anne Marie K chose to use these particular methods to help the women’s position in the Egyptian society and break extremist social norms.

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ANNIE EUNBYEOL CHOI

Having spent her time in the halls of London’s elite fashion schools and surrounding herself with industry peers, Annie began to notice a stark similarity. Black has circulated saliently, a modest staple in wardrobes and central piece to many designers’ collections. She poses the question, how many black items do you have in your wardrobe?

Her research then started off with two simple queries: What is black? Why do people love wearing black?

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ANSON LAU

The eye often plays tricks on us. We usually see what we want to see – our brains way of filtering out all the tiny nuances that would otherwise be too overwhelming. Anson Lau, a Textile Design graduate from Central Saint Martins focuses on these preconceptions and more often than not misconceptions. Taking some wise words from the wise philosopher Aristotle to heart, “our senses can be trusted but they can be easily fooled”, her collection focuses on the disparity between what we see and what actually is.

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BECKY HONG

“ Fragility “

{ The quality of being easily broken or damaged. ]

We standing in reality, we existing in this world filled with imperfections and impermanent.

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BEICHEN GUAN

Beichen Guan’s collection is inspired by the star pattern emoji that people easily can understand, transformed into teeth whitening products and tools. The collection is a entertaining way to show people just like her, who try so hard to whiten their teeth because of aesthetic pressures from society.

The human tooth has evolved since the ancient age. Dental development in the modern world is a milestone that every person has to undergo in child development. But in the contemporary consumer culture, dental treatment has always been “cosmetic”, concerned with aesthetics as much as function. In this project, she used her own dental surgeries as the starting research and trying to understand how dentists design the treatments regimen to each patient. Without any judgments of the dental industry.

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BEN STEPHEN FORD

Ben Stephen Ford’s graduate collection is inspired by the concept of wanting to ‘fix it’ or ‘put it right’, playing with the impulse of those who can’t stop that internal need for perfection.

The idea can be best described as a crooked hanging frame, some would see the fault from a distance away, however some may just walk past it. It is those who have to fix the problem who are the ones that are being captured in the collection.

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BETHAN CURRIE

Colour and labour intensive textile techniques are the key aspects of Bethan's creations, as well as personal and meaningful narratives. She designs for a woman who is feminine, fearless and with a sense of humour.

Drawing on her interests in retro aesthetics and interiors, Bethan’s final collection, “NUKE KID ON THE BLOCK”, began with a hunt to find 1970s bathrooms full of vibrant colour and intricate textures. Her own Grandma’s bubble-gum pink en-suite proved one of the most intriguing, with it’s floral tiles and bulb shaped taps, that later went on to inform silhouette and print.

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BETHANY HILTON

Meaningful movement, Natural habits, And Intuitive behaviour. Derived from the German term, meaning a longing to travel to a place where you feel at home, Bethany’s debut Graduate collection ‘Heimweh’ looks at traditional nomadic qualities in a contrast to a modern society.

Exploring the time-honoured lifestyle, the pulls of life and a new evolution of nomads, driving the urge to re-nature and trust our instinct in, the tech driven world of today. Analysing the differentiation between a contemporary lifestyle and traveling to the inner cities and a contrasting approach of living from the land self-sufficiently. As part of the nomadic art movement, Joseph Beuys aids Bethany’s research in understanding the connection of the nomad and the natural world.

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BOYANG JIANG

The utilitarian function of clothing is to house the human body, a body that is always in constant motion. Bo Yang Jiang's collection is an interpretation of this relationship. She dissects the prime functions of what clothing does, on one hand it satisfies the practical demands and on the other, its a manifestation of character.

For her MA Fashion graduate collection at Kingston University, BoYang turned to contemporary dance for inspiration. She looked into female contemporary dancers and choreographers such as Silvia Gribaudi, who is know for her work in body politics through dance. Through this research, BoYang was able to inspect the different elements of dance to identify the correlation between expression and movement. She then transformed these movements into her garment patterns.

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BRYAN WAN

“When your world is collapsing, when everything is closing in, what you want is to be somewhere else, somewhere you can breathe in peace, a scrap of beauty, far from the noise and ugliness but, if there is no escape then you go there in your dreams and you paint that landscape into existence.”

Bryan Wan’s collection was aiming to express the concept through his pattern cutting and designing processes, inspired by his initial inspiration which is trying to translate the elegant and simple lines and the shapes and spaces of traditional Chinese hand made Ming furnitures and ceramics.

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CAROLINE PERINO

Although Caroline Perino’s collection is clearly inspired by art and painting, firstly it found inspiration in the kinetic sculpture field and the movement of machines. The process started by researching pictures that brought inspiration to the designer, and by doing so she realised most of the pictures were sculptures with complex forms or paintings with many elements and objects spread on the canvas. Some of her inspirations included art work made by Alexander Calder, Miró, Picasso and Kandinsky.

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CÉLINE MARIE

The AW18 debut collection HUMAN MECHANOIDS has been inspired by Swiss surrealist painter HR Giger and his idea of the biome- chanoid and explores the physical relationship between digital technology and the human body. The partially controversially perceived imagery created by the artists’ depiction of reality at the time suggests that we are inevitably transformed into a kind of human machinery. Placing his idea into modern context leads to the idea of viewing social media as an extension of ourselves due to constant engagement.

This collection is a statement for humanity. A statement to make us realise in what world we live in. And a statement to make us realise that technology is not only surrounding us but essentially becoming part of us, almost taking over our minds, our actions, our bodies.

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CHAERIN LEE

Chaerin Lee fuses the silhouettes of 1980's sportswear, the expressionism of renowned artist Jackson Pollock and the vibrant colours of Leigh Bowery's make-up and costumes. With these inspirations at the forefront of Chaerin's mind, she set out to create a collection that could have a positive impact on human emotion using Colour Theory.

Knowing that people in busy modern societies often suffer from fatigue, Chaerin Lee developed energetic prints and patterns inspired by the expressive movement seen in the work of American artist Jackson Pollock. She tested these colourful yet subtle prints on different fabrics, familiarising herself with the nuances in the results.

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CHARLOTTE MOORE

Charlotte’s collection California Dreamin was inspired by the beautifully accessible Salvation Mountain which is based in California where people from all around the world go to worship anything and everything they wish to. Charlotte created this collection using her own strong handdrawn prints with cultured silhouettes. She also gained a massive LOVE for embroidery design inspired by converting everyone to see the world in the way others do.

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CHARLOTTE THOMPSON

Charlotte Emma Thompson’s collection portrays a feminine, dreamy atmospheric portfolio that shows the story of her collection, the individual inspiration and design process for each piece.

The concept of her graduate jewellery collection ‘Babygirl’ is a celebration of the strength in sisterhood. In a current world of strong male politics culture her project embodies femininity and girlhood with strength. The main inspiration/concept came purely from icons such as Chloe Sevigny, Tavi Gevinson and Solange. Along with Sofia Coppola’s film: The Virgin Suicides and Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s film: Mustang.

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CHRISTINA SEEWALD

Christina’s research topic is concerned with sexual dependency and interdependency between individuals. Many people in big cities like London have the desire to be independent, but at the same time a craving for the intensity that comes from interdependency. The tension this creates seems to be a universal problem. (Nan Goldin)

In order to get visual inspiration she collaborated with Jelly Luise, another CSM student to create a mood film that would support her final collection in terms of colour, shape and structure. Christina provided image-heavy research that was rooted in Nan Goldin’s ‘Ballad of Sexual Dependency’, Schiele drawings and many others.

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CLAIRE TAGG

Claire Tagg uses detailed print work in an illustrative style based on narrative to design her pieces. Her inspiration derives from travel and photography but mainly from her previous occupation as an air stewardess.

Claire created remarkable illustrations by drawing in a mixed media style in different scales to create motifs. She would then use Photoshop to allow her to digitally print onto her garments through a mixture of digital and screen printing.

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CONSTANCA ENTRUDO

Constanca Entrudo’s graduate collection is inspired by the whole idea of performance, circus and transgression. By embracing chaos during the creative process she aimed to generate fabrics that would challenge the usual processes of print making through the use of techniques such as dyeing, bondawebbing, melting different materials, pleating, folding and embossing.

In the first phase of her research she started by looking at Circus archives, London based performers and visited various vintage costume shops, such as Prangsta Costumiers, all over the UK in order to learn more about the materials and fittings that have been used in theatres and burlesque performances.

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DESREE AKORAHSON

Desree Akorahson conducted her primary research by visiting Kew Gardens and drawing and collection information about the rarity of the flowers. She wanted to create a hand rendered, botanical look about her prints, which is why she chose to draw her prints by hand using fine liners and using Photoshop to add in the colours. By using this technique, she was able to enhance the brightness in all of the colours chosen.

Desree was inspired by artists such as Bridget Riley and William Morris when it came to creating her prints. She combined these two styles and added in some influences from 60s fashion.

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DINA FUSI


Attention at the core to these craft techniques gives a sense of childlike play through tactile experimentation and draws consumers into a rich and unique tangible experience with the brand.

The attention to craft processes is complemented throughout the collection by the use of modern digital techniques, including laser cutting and computer embroidery, allowing for more experimental and unique results.

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EDEN KESHIA

Eden Keshia’s graduate collection is inspired by the curiously beautiful artworks created during early infancy. The erratic brush-strokes and experimental nature of the paintings and scribbles prove to be an interesting starting point for colourful prints and hand-painted designs.

Always adorned with hand-rendered intricacies, designs feature hand-painted details, bespoke embroidery and tactile embellishments, intended to appeal to all senses. The ethos of this collection embraces the concept of a slower-paced fashion; the design process focuses on creating high-quality wearable art pieces which can be kept and treasured.

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ELENA KURGINYAN

A starting point for Elena’s collection was a film “The Colour of Pomegranates” as cinematography takes a big part in her research and design developmentt. One of the key points of both of her concept and designs started after reading a book by Hamid Naficy “An Accented Cinema”. Elena’s thinking process and the narrative of the project has been influenced by numerous personal feelings such as memory, nostalgia, family and relationships between people.

Elena conducts a test with rubber bands and wire models to have an overview of the outcome. By having first chosen the right metal with the desired colour as well as thickness, Elena then applies heat and pressure to alter the shape of metal rods, to fit the various shapes of the hand or of two hands.

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ELISHA CORINNE

Elisha Corinne’s debut collection titled ‘The Lost Boys’ came from her interests into travel and exploration of new places. Shackleton’s famous Antarctic voyage first inspired this story with influence from the equipment, clothing and surrounding environments.

During the design development process Elisha wanted to distort the normal shapes and silhouettes of garments. Enlarging and folding trousers and classic shirts then pairing these with fisherman inspired silhouettes creating a well-considered collection.

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EMILY CLARK

Emily began designing womenswear because, as a young girl, the idea of designing for men simply never occurred to her. It wasn't until her second year at Kingston University that a tutor assumed her clothes were for men, when all of a sudden the penny dropped. Ever since she has been obsessed with Mens clothing, from tailoring and formalwear to sportswear and RTW.

When studying abroad in Asia Emily became extremely aware of the stark differences between male friendships in the East compared to that of the West, and began to question the social construct of masculinity.

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EMILY HE

Many words have been penned about the differences between the East and the West. The list is rather extensive, subcategories under umbrella categories. Emily He, a graduate from London College of Fashion BA Jewellery program, can speak extensively about this subject - a subject that inspired her graduate collection.

Having spent an equal amount of time in both Hong Kong and the UK, Emily’s voice on culture difference, habits and behaviours comes from experience.

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ERICKA SANTIAGO

Islanders is a project that celebrates the lives of the people in the Philippines -Ericka’s place of birth. She wanted to portray the happy and colourful lives of the people that inhabit the Islands. She was particularly fascinated by the mode of transport that is widely used in the country - The Jeepneys. They are known for their crowded seating and decorations which have become a symbol of the Philippine culture and Art.

As someone who did not grow up in the Philippines, her view of the country is different to those that have lived their whole lives there. To the Islanders, the jeepney is a vehicle to get to work, school and home. To Ericka, it is a special reminder of the diverse culture that she is a part of.

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FRANKIE DEAN

The use of print throughout Frankie Dean’s collection is based on the Siamese fighting fish. Their territorial behaviour provided a parallel to how people assert their possession of space exterior to themselves and circle around each other in the same way as the Siamese fighting fish do when they are about to attack. Each drawing is layered with both straight and tape lines that expresses an externalisation of presence in space.

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GEMMA HILL

The Initial Inspiration is taken from the concept of visioning beauty of local nature. Gemma has been heavily inspired by the beauty of nature and gardens of North Yorkshire where she would often be infatuated by scenes when walking her dog or driving through the countryside. She recorded her findings with photographs and then later used them to develop her ideas in an tactile and illustrative way through drawing and experimentation with fabrics and textures.

With a love for illustration and drawing, she decided to develop her design through textile crafting with her graduate thesis arguing the issues of mechanical takeover, which would take away a designers personal creativity and humane skill.

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GEORGINA JENKINS

Georgina’s graduate collection was inspired by Yayoi Kusama, a Japanese artist and writer. She would look through her arts pieces, painting and sculptures to help her to develop her own work. Finding out Yayoi suffered from obsessive-compulsive neurosis and hallucinations played a big part in how Georgina was influenced by the artist. She found both her work and her story mesmerising and fascinating.

Following on from this, Georgina discover a sculptor from South Korea called Choi Xoo Ang who is mainly known for his unearthly but highly intricate human figures. Distorted, haunted and definitely not one for the squeamish, Choi’s work reveals his deep concern for the human condition in society.

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GERALDINE WU

The collection was inspired by illuminated manuscripts. Illumination was used in historic periods to aggrandise ancient documents, being visually decorative to ornament text. This form of art added ornament but did not take away from the value of the words it adorned, rather it was an extension of what the texts expressed.

Using frames, text and ornament, Geraldine emulated a similar effect in her jewellery pieces. The metal has a deliberate rough, raw quality to it, emphasising the imperfections and scars the pieces have, almost as if they had ‘lived to tell the tale’.

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GONY HAN

Gony Han’s graduate collection was inspired by a used packaging material richness in shapes. The pieces from the waste of the packaging have its own identity with colours, texture and shapes. She made a new creative shape of the pieces by her glance.

The pieces from the used packaging changed to new pieces. Gony discovered some interesting shapes by accident from the waste of packaging. She used it actively with collague and then draw it on the transparent paper to see how it comes out. Also, she used laser-cutting machine using some fabrics with shapes of the inspiration from the pieces of packaging.

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HAIPU ZENG

1960s China witnessed the rise of the cultural revolution, a political movement that was reflected strongly in the fashion of its time. With the importance of these newfound sociopolitical ideals, utilitarian and unisex fashion was rife – the idea was to place emphasis on collectivism. Clothing throughout the masses were very similar, a sea of dark blue or green tunic suits paired with white shirts.

The idea of the collective through clothing in contrast with later eras of fashion that emphasised individualism sparked an interest in Womenswear Design graduate Haipu Zeng.

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HAN ZHU

Having always been inspired by ancient stories within Chinese history, Han used this passion and tailored it to fashion. By bringing the past into the present she was able to embody both Chinese heritage and craft innovation, which allowed her garments to transform and seamlessly blend ancient culture into the now.

For her final collection, Han Zhu used traditional embroidery fabric and waterproof materials mixed with leather. Han believed she had a responsibility to her Chinese heritage. She did not want to see traditional elements disappear, which is why she chose to develop them in a more modern way.

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HOLLY MACLEOD

Holly MacLeod’s collection was inspired by her own personal style, considering the unconventional way she chooses to style herself from her eclectic wardrobe.

Following on from the research of collage, Holly took images and collaged over them to create unexpected, disproportionate silhouettes, showcasing a range of colours and textures.

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ILONA HARS

Ilona Hars’ collection is inspired by her home county, Norway, and the colour, texture and shapes found in nature. This was her main starting point for choice of colour and fabrics and her embroidery and manipulation developments. The silhouettes and details are inspired by vintage skiwear from the 1930’s and 40’s.

Throughout the collection she focuses on a strong contrast between luxury and sporty, in the use of luxurious, feminine fabrics and sporty webbing and waterproof zips.

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JAMES REEVES

In a time where gender neutrality takes precedence, how has the conventional notions of menswear changed? James Reeves poses this question and through his designs, tackles some of these complexities.

Historically speaking, men’s dress was simply put, very straightforward – military uniforms, suit variations and white-collar attire. These styles were often crafted in traditional prints such as herringbone and houndstooth. These stiff dress regulations formed the foundation of James' garments.

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JEONGHYEON HAHN

The word ‘Grotesque’ refers to the combination of highly contrasting objects or concepts together. In the case of these illustrations, it is composed of the deconstructed human body, organs and natural creatures and artificial objects. By deconstructing the complete garments, inner structures are revealed and they are connected with free-style draping to create new designs and suggest unconventional ways of wearing

Jeonghyeon was able to create a new combination of design with a feminine mood through the use of exquisite material and tailoring. Successfully incorporating delicate details and intriguing elements to the design.

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JESSIE MCGUIRE

I interviewed Tim Buckle, a retired Team GB cyclist and junior coach who told me about the world of elite cycling and what inspired him to take up the sport. He described watching Stephen Roche in the 1987 Tour De France dramatic finish as he reached La Plagne: “I flicked channel 4 on and it happened to be this epic stage race, Stephen Roche flaked out and needed oxygen.

The drama of it, how cool this guy looked, the colour, everything about it was fantastic. That’s what I wanted to do for a living.” The nostalgia and excitement of the competitive cycling world was another big inspiration to me as the project developed. I used graphic imagery and lettering to retain this sense of spectacle, adventure and excitement.

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JILL HYNDMAN

The research process began with combining menswear with womenswear, starting with the mood board seen above. The inspiration started with looking at beautifully elegant 18th century menswear from the famous Fashion Museum, which as a Bath Spa student, Jill was lucky to have just outside her door step.

To contrast with the masculine theme, Jill also looked at women’s vintage lingerie from the 19th century, with focus on the camp corset with its winding cords. Much like fabrics used within these time periods, this collection consists of luxurious dusty pastel fabrics with rich lace and shimmering metallic textures.

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JIN LEE

Jin Lee’s collection is themed around a combination of coexistence and conflict condition within feminism. Inspired by Colette, a New York feminist artist in the 70s, Jin’s designs would follow a similar aesthetic, in which both were affected by a maximalist environment and contrasts between soft materials and outdoor chaos.

Being a woman in the 21st century is very different from what it was like thirty years ago. Nowadays, women are told to be independent, strong creatures and not just soft and nurturing. Jin’s graduate collection combines the two emotions, both delicate and vigorous.

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JISU KANG

Jisu’s graduate collection was strongly inspired by the city she grew up in South Korea due to its many contrasting contradictions. Her hometown was both nature friendly and scientifically developed. Jisu picked up on these two juxtapositions and learnt how they coexist in one city. Combining both science and art from her hometown, Jisu used this to develop a flexible way of thinking when it came to her work.

Her influences continued to grow through how she began to express her thoughts and emotions through her surroundings and experiences in daily life. She turned her negative experience with depression into something positive by using it to inspire her graduate collection.

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JIYEON LEE

Jiyeon Lee’s graduate collection inspiration came from washing machines. One button is pressed and everything is spinning and all twisted together. She felt that her identity was also tangled up within that. Following the wash, the clothes are hung out to dry, which is where her thoughts also straighten out.

This influence came about when Lee was in Tokyo, she saw an old woman carrying a laundry basket whose floral print outfit she fell in love with. She watched as the woman stopped to put her garments onto her drying rack.

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JOOHYE EMMA PARK

Joohye Emma Park’s manifesto talks about emancipation of women’s bodies that is especially based on feminism. However, it led her to question herself, ‘Am I truly a feminist or just someone who is following the trend?’

Today, feminism is regarded as an important issue at every corner of society. ‘The third wave of feminism is now, and it is intersectional.’ (Land, 2013) It contributed on her thinking about the authenticity, generating a question: why have I become a feminist. She thought back of her old school days to question whether she was an angry rebellious teenager.

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JOSEFINE ALMASANU

Josefine Almasanu’s work often starts with a mood. Her work often tends tells a story of escapism, with a mood inspired from fantasy and nature. She is also heavily influenced by costume design and historic dress such as the Victorian and Romanic eras. Furthermore, Almasanu tries to explore current issues in her work to give it modern relevance. As an artist she wants her designs to reflect some of the ideals and debates from our time, while also keeping a sense of the past.

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JULIANE RUMPF

Juliane used organic lines that part and come together, to represent celebrating the beauty of migration. This then led her towards a unique design approach which applies to both her fabric manipulations and creative cutting.

Despite the very topical and current nature of the concept, Juliane applied strict design rules to allow her to create timeless signature shapes and fabrics. The coherence between her fabric innovations and creative cuts creates a seamlessly recognisable signature style.

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KELLY ATTENBERGER

Kelly’s work is informed by the experimentation and development of a variety of textural forms including knitwear; sculpted into wearable garments. Alongside these more experimental processes she uses Lectra pattern cutting software to complement and enhance the design process, in order to achieve a carefully considered shape.

Kelly was inspired by her surroundings in the summer of 2016 spent in a rural part of Connecticut. This land previously owned by native American tribes 100 years ago, is now used to continue the teaching of traditional dances to keep skills alive for generations to come.

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KEJIA WUCHENG

In the eyes of Kejia, architecture and fashion garments have always had a special relationship, as they both surround and protect the space of our physical body. In the beginning of her project, titled " Architectual skin", Kejia was inspired by Frank Gehry's architecture creations, especially the way she manipulates the shape of window, and the curve lines she utilises in some of her designs.

Kejia thought she could recreate these elements in fashion textile, as she sees fashion and architecture sharing the same purpose: to provide protection for our physical body.

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LAURA CAPELLO

Laura’s graduate collection is about the journey of a mysterious woman living in a far away world. This collection is inspired by two very different yet both highly detailed types of clothing. On one hand, it was influenced by the 1870s Victorian fashion which is well shown in the handcrafted detailed elements.

On the other hand, there is the modernity and cleanness of space suits and science fiction, which has led to a dramatic but realistic fashion story.

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LAUREN CUTFORTH

It was 2017, acid attacks in London were frequent as well as consistent fears of terrorist related plots looming in the air for most Londoners.

At the time, Lauren (founder of Cutforth & Conquer) had been busy immersing herself in as many British music festivals she could get her hands on, she adored the fashion, and the constant reference of 70’s sequins and fashion was hard to ignore, “I suffered terrible with transport related anxiety so festivals were a good way of escaping reality”.

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