DESIGN PROCESS

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JOOMI JAY JUNG

Over 40’s people are good at making their own style through basic items. Normally, their style is simple and neat with unique accessories or items, even their white hair can be used to represent by themselves naturally. They aren’t intend to be fashionable with fancy or gorgeous items because they already knew a specific point in minimalist fashion. I might feel ‘Mature Beauty’ through those fashion styles.

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JOSEFINE ALMASANU

Josefine Almasanu’s work often starts with a mood. Her work often tends tells a story of escapism, with a mood inspired from fantasy and nature. She is also heavily influenced by costume design and historic dress such as the Victorian and Romanic eras. Furthermore, Almasanu tries to explore current issues in her work to give it modern relevance. As an artist she wants her designs to reflect some of the ideals and debates from our time, while also keeping a sense of the past.

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JULIANE RUMPF

Juliane used organic lines that part and come together, to represent celebrating the beauty of migration. This then led her towards a unique design approach which applies to both her fabric manipulations and creative cutting.

Despite the very topical and current nature of the concept, Juliane applied strict design rules to allow her to create timeless signature shapes and fabrics. The coherence between her fabric innovations and creative cuts creates a seamlessly recognisable signature style.

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KELLY ATTENBERGER

Kelly’s work is informed by the experimentation and development of a variety of textural forms including knitwear; sculpted into wearable garments. Alongside these more experimental processes she uses Lectra pattern cutting software to complement and enhance the design process, in order to achieve a carefully considered shape.

Kelly was inspired by her surroundings in the summer of 2016 spent in a rural part of Connecticut. This land previously owned by native American tribes 100 years ago, is now used to continue the teaching of traditional dances to keep skills alive for generations to come.

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KEJIA WUCHENG

In the eyes of Kejia, architecture and fashion garments have always had a special relationship, as they both surround and protect the space of our physical body. In the beginning of her project, titled " Architectual skin", Kejia was inspired by Frank Gehry's architecture creations, especially the way she manipulates the shape of window, and the curve lines she utilises in some of her designs.

Kejia thought she could recreate these elements in fashion textile, as she sees fashion and architecture sharing the same purpose: to provide protection for our physical body.

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KIM TIZIANA ROTTMULLER

The collection Oblivion is complex and controversial. It takes its inspiration from a seductive, witchy diva and is dealing a lot with symbolism and spirituality.

The part of the labyrinth which can be seen in every outfit through the massive strips, embroidery and self-designed print is metaphoric to our personal thoughts and feelings, in which we can get lost. On the other hand is the witch a symbolism for our transcendental self and inner magical power. Supported with tarot cards included within the clothes.

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LAURA CAPELLO

Laura’s graduate collection is about the journey of a mysterious woman living in a far away world. This collection is inspired by two very different yet both highly detailed types of clothing. On one hand, it was influenced by the 1870s Victorian fashion which is well shown in the handcrafted detailed elements.

On the other hand, there is the modernity and cleanness of space suits and science fiction, which has led to a dramatic but realistic fashion story.

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LAUREN CUTFORTH

It was 2017, acid attacks in London were frequent as well as consistent fears of terrorist related plots looming in the air for most Londoners.

At the time, Lauren (founder of Cutforth & Conquer) had been busy immersing herself in as many British music festivals she could get her hands on, she adored the fashion, and the constant reference of 70’s sequins and fashion was hard to ignore, “I suffered terrible with transport related anxiety so festivals were a good way of escaping reality”.

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LISA HANNA OSIMO

Lisa Hanna Osimo’s collection was inspired by a need and a right she has got of being different, unique and especially FREE. She speaks for every woman and man, who’s tired of being judged and who just wants to express her uniqueness and style through her attitude as well as with her look.

While she was looking for material inspiration she came across a nylon mesh tube that has got a peculiar mechanism of “trapping” the finger once it has been worn.

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LIZA KAIN

Liza came across an image of Sarah Bernhard in the role of the Byzantine empress Theodora and the image got stuck in her head. It emanated intense power, but also there was a sense of vulnerability, timelessness and very pure femininity. From that moment on she knew what she wanted her collection to be.

The center of her research became the topic of women in history/art who were portrayed as creatures able to enchant and enslave anyone who crosses their path, such as Oscar Wilde’s story of Salome and the dance of 7 veils.

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LOTTIE EDGAR

Originally fascinated by the idea of opening up closed forms, through a meditative process, sketching, Lottie began exploring how she could apply internal space to closed forms. These 2D spatial exploration sketches provided a platform of inspiration for her collection.

Through a transition between dimensions, she took the initial 2D forms and transferred them into 3D form through cutting and draping fabric onto a body. The cutting of the fabric exposed the inner space between the fabric and the body and allowed the idea of space to flow through a garment.

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LUCY SALTINSTALL

Lucy Saltinstall’s collection was heavily inspired by the High Line in New York, which she came across last year whilst visiting the city.

Incorporating the juxtaposition of brutalist structures and the resilience of nature into her designs, Lucy created an androgynous womenswear collection featuring a mixture of tailoring, knitwear and sportswear detailing, a new genre to portray the clashing of these two concepts.

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LYDIA FUNG SZE KI

In Lydia Fung’s MA collection Nebulous Erotica, she is trying to see new age intimacy through her own world. Lydia started with her 2D visual exploration to express the freedom of endlessness and formless erotica in the digital age, there are no ends and beginnings of bodies in her images, every interaction, every object, subject is formless.

It is amorphous, it is raw, it is not fixed, it is freed. How bodies interact intimately with each other is purely based on the essence, based on a formless bond, based on the tension in between.

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MADDIE WILLIAMS

Maddie’s graduate collection was heavily inspired by the Wilder Mann documentary by Charles Freger. It is about how the transformation of man to beast is a central aspect of traditional pagan rituals that are centuries old, which celebrate the seasonal cycle, fertility, life and death.

Each year throughout Europe, from Scotland to Bulgaria, from Finland to Italy, from Portugal to Greece, Switzerland and Germany, people literally put themselves into the skin of the ‘savage’, in a masquerades that stretch back centuries.

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MADDY STRINGER

Maddy Stringer’s S/S 19 collection draws inspiration from the beauty in the mundane, exploring the human desire to collect and why we can feel connected to inanimate objects.

Maddy identifies with being a hoarder, her most notable collections include an extensive range of hotel soap packets and miniature doll’s house furniture items. The juxtaposition of traditional furnishing motifs and bright plastic packaging became the unexpected starting point for Maddy’s designs.

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MANON PLANCHE

Inspired by drag racing cars and their bold and eclectic drivers, this collection celebrates the sport’s daring and playful spirit. Protective wear and car interiors inform inventive pattern cutting and textiles techniques – creating new and exciting 3D surfaces using foam squares trapped in between layers of fabrics.

Focusing on the contrast between rigid and flowing fabrics in exaggerated silhouettes with details borrowed from sportswear, the car’s complex construction is referenced throughout.

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MANON PRADIER

Everything in nature can be seen as patterns. We as a human race derive inspiration from this. We construct concrete jungles, build roads like vines and tree roots, follow a flow where feathers grow in, making us so much a.LIKE to nature.

Manon’s collection is a Ready To Wear collection which takes influence from this, colliding the worlds of geometrical shapes and architecture, with the repetition found throughout nature; these elements are key details to each garments.

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MARIA IVANESCU COTUNA

Maria Ivanescu Cotuna’s designs are filled with stereotypical cultural meanings. Each piece is created using dissimilar materials and colours, allowing her to explore enigmatic analogies while designing. She aims to both subdue and regulate desire. The cunningness of the collection is unpredictable and adverse.

Mischief is represented by the tongue, that twirls invitingly, the gesture is sarcastically provocative. The cross stands for pure appropriation yet the association with the tongue defiles the propriety and the sanctity of the religious symbol.

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MARINE BEYBUDYAN

Marine Beybudyan's “Entangled” collection was initially inspired by Louise Bourgeois artwork, explores an idea of knots as a form of therapy for mental illnesses. Bourgeois considered art as a "form of psychoanalysis", offering unique access to the unconscious, as well as a form of psychological release.

Exploration of knotted shapes convey mixed emotions and feelings such as anxiety, fear and anger.

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MATILDA ABERG

Matilda Aberg’s collection was inspired by a story she came up with herself drawing inspiration from Swedish folk myth. It is a story of a lost princess in the dark Northern forests of the 17th Century and her encounters with the creatures of the forest - the femme fatals. From them she learns about sisterhood and revenge.

The inspiration of the collection comes from royal fashion with heavy velvets, the veils of the elves, the naked body of the mistress of the forest as well as her rotten back.

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MAYYA AGAYEVA

The collection is inspired from digital footprints recorded by Google, revealing our digital twin and a new internet culture which reflects our digital life. You can be anything you want online, as the internet is a space that promotes visibility as the ultimate equalising platform. Internet culture has been the biggest inspiration for Mayya's designs for many years. There are three significant steps in creating a data-based collection.

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MEGAN ROSE

Megan Rose’s collection ‘obsessive|compulsive chaos’ is in aftermath from her most recent collection banepn valeri, where a new sense of understanding is found through the element of collecting. ‘Obsessive|compulsive chaos’ moves on from the formal elements of collecting- entertaining a more obsessive, compulsive chaotic association surrounding collecting with a strong focus on symbolising objects in place and being.

The collection really captures the impact of obsessive compulsive hoarding, developed from the initial inspiration of her Grandmother and her unusual range of collections on display within her home.

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MEGAN STRANGE

Megan wanted to present the idea of reflection, layers and silhouette through her collection.Through her design process she would refer back to her concept and colour boards to gain inspiration on how the layering of the images could develop into garments.

The silhouettes are inspired by the transparent flower photographs and how gentle yet impactful they were. The layering of the images inspired Megan to create the pleating throughout her collection, she wanted to use a range of pleating techniques to create depth and detail.

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MEIQI LUO

Inspired by a combination of both manmade and natural settings, such as buildings in the rain, Meiqi’s designs are unique and everything in life can be considered as an inspiration.

Strong characteristics and skilful techniques come together to create an artistic aesthetic, in which the quality and shaping of the metal she uses as a material is a priority in her collections. As well as considering the movement, tiny details are also important when it comes to the qualities of the stainless steel and laser-welder used to combine steel and metal together beautifully.

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MELANIE YAU

For many Third Culture Kids, the curiosity of one's ancestral heritage is a growing enigma. Embracing her Third Culture Kid status, Melanie Yau, a British-born Chinese fashion design graduate from the University of South Wales, had always been genuinely interested in her roots – places she visited as a child had an instantaneous familiarity yet at the same time sowed feelings of displacement. To get in touch with her family history, Melanie started watching Chinese period dramas from an early age.

Fashion and history had always shared a mutually beneficial kinship, where looking back helped fashion move forward. For Melanie’s first collection, this kinship was the core of her inspiration.

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MENG ZHANG

Meng takes inspiration from Chinese calligraphy, architectural forms and curves and gestures of the human body. Curves constantly change and form unexpected lines; this tells you a lot about the wearer’s personality. The energy within movement shares the same philosophy and logic as Chinese calligraphy.

Meng connects intangible movement to tangible volume with every stroke. She combines modern elements of architecture shapes to further enhance her designs.

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MICHELLE LUNG

Michelle Lung’s collection draws upon the untouchability of digital culture we are undoubtedly surrounded by and arguably depend on everyday. Nowadays, it may be argued technology is one of our most valued possessions; if there was a fire, most people would reach for their smartphones and laptops before the contents of their jewellery box. The majority of people hold a mobile or are plugged into earphones closer to their body more than jewellery does. So are these now becoming arguably more personal, precious and considered artefacts to adorn the body than jewellery is?

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MICHELLE MCAULEY

Michelle researched over her families history over many generations and it became apparent to her that textile processes were passed from one generation to the next. For example, her mother taught her skills and processes from which her own mother passed onto her. These skills are iconic and in-stilled within our roots, something which I want to continue as these skills once pasted are at the risk of dying out.

Michelle aims to make the viewer really see beyond traditional textiles as dated, by refreshing traditional methods into modern and contemporary designs.

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MIETE FARRER

Miette Farrer’s graduate collection, created in collaboration with Katie Westwood, was inspired by craft processes and the reinvention of the familiar. Drawing inspiration from the mass produced shirt and jeans, innovative textile techniques were explored to recreate the shadows, creases and suggestion of these garments. With the focus on process, techniques were pushed to the limits in order to recreate entire fabrics.

The importance of slow fashion is reflected through the time consuming processes of hand painting, cutting, manipulating and stitching to create fabrics and garments.

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MONIKA JAUNEIKAITE

The collection 'Two Spirits' has been strongly influenced by the topic of gender.The main inspiration has risen from transgender Native American and XIX century cross-dressing women that strongly questioned gender norms in that age and had major impact redefining gender perspectives.

Inspiration came from various periods and cultural backgrounds such as American Natives, Two Spirit is a culturally distinct gender that describes Indigenous North Americans who fulfil one of many mixed gender roles found traditionally among many Native Americans.

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NADIA WIRE ALBRECHTSEN

The central aim of Color Intelligence is to highlight the importance of colour: How colour can guide and direct and tell its own language. A case study about lace and its patterns, formed the foundation for this collection: How women in the 18th century didn't knew how to read and therefore lace patterns was mapped out with a colour for each stitch. This aspect of using colours, as guidance is the main focus in Color Intelligence.

Michel Pastoureau's theory on colour and stripes founded the concept for this collection. Therefore this collection includes linear and irregular stripes from a naive and spontaneous point of view.

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NIA WINSTANLEY

Inspired by living out of a suitcase whilst on Erasmus and her late father’s organised collection of memorabilia, Nia Winstanley’s collection reflects on how our increasingly nomadic lifestyles require new ways of containing our innate hoarding instinct.

The contradiction between wanting to preserve throwaway items developed into the idea of ‘elevating trash’ using materials such as sequins and diamanté trims to create a collection which question the boundaries of ‘good’ taste.Superficially, hoarding suggests a celebration of excess, but it can also be a physical and mental burden.

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NICOLE CARRASCO

‘’Why (my) love?’’ Is a project born from the designer’s personal concern towards the narcissist approach of feelings in modern society after the arise of social medias. Inspired by the book ‘TheAgony of the Eros’ (Byung Chul Han, 2012) the designer explores the individualism and technology manipulation of social interaction, which sees an increase of narcissism that looks for love and desire within the ‘inferno of the same’.

She explores how this phenomenon is directly reflected in fashion which sees an abandonment of feelings and a more superficial approach towards it, both in the purchase (online shopping, fast fashion) and in the actual creative process (copy and paste from past collections).

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NINGYAO ZHANG

Ningyao Zhang combines traditional Chinese culture with modern fashion design to create her pieces. Having a strong interest in historic Chinese painting and calligraphy helped her create her graduate collection.

Before coming to London to study, Zhang was very interested in Chinese culture but found that it could be quite limited when it came to evolving her personal style and developing an understanding of fashion.

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ODELLA YUE

Odella Yue is originally from China, growing up in China and England was an interesting experience, she enjoyed her exploration in the two very different cultures, both of which have influenced her design style greatly.

Odella appreciates Chinese traditional culture as well as modern digital culture; her work is often inspired by her Chinese heritage and transformed into fashion designs with a modern digital twist. Growing up as a child, she was always the nerdy one and used comic books and games to dream and escape to a world of unfettered imagination.

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OLESYA SERCHENKO

My collection gets its inspiration from peasant’s life on the turn of the 19th century, just before the Russian Revolution. It was a hard and significant time in history, when old and new worlds collided. Dramatic changes occurred in peoples minds.

The main element of the whole collection is the fabric’s textures. It has a neoprene structure and golden embroidery 3D effect. This old decorative technique was my main inspiration. I wanted to recreate this with modern technologies, as I wanted to keep a noticable contrast between traditions and modernity.

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OLIVIA MAILEY

Olivia used her abstract photography as the key development when it came to designing her collection. By capturing the uncontrollable reactions triggered during physical and chemical changes she aimed to use her photography to spark a vivid colour palette, pairing pops of citrus tones with translucencies.

Initially inspired by David Mcleod’s 3D digital illustrations that represent movement and fluidity. The synthetic surfaces in Mcleod’s abstract compositions used in the IBM Outthink campaign illustrate the transition between different states of matter such as liquids, solids and gases.

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PALOMA ALARCON

Throughout the years it has become noticeable that culture tends to have an influence on the way individuals experience and perceive life. Paloma has always had a profound admiration for Peru, its culture and its people.

Being bought up in Lima, the capital of Peru, developed her interest and admiration of their architecture and textile manipulation. Their colourful layered houses and diverse historical locations such as Macchu Picchu and Chan Chan provide meaningful illustrations of ancient art.

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PENG YE

刹那 is the word that represents the shortest accountable time in Chinese, and equal to 1000000000000000000 / 1 second. This is a project about distortion, transformation and the complexity behind simpleness.

The project begins with a part of my memory from childhood. When I was younger, I used to sit in my father’s car and look at the things moving backwards outside the window. I always enjoyed looking at the fence beside the highway. When things quickly moving behind the stripes of fence, I see the shape of the things being broken, distorted and twisted, which amazed me a lot.

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PENG YU WANG

Inspired by the way insects are constantly renovating and breaking their own inherent patterns in order to become brand new, vivacious and beautiful beings, Peng Yu focused on breaking original lifestyles when it came to creating his collection.

Moving on from this, Peng Yu began observing himself and how he immerses himself into the world, and more importantly, into a chaotic society. Through this he learnt who he wanted to be and how to achieve that goal.

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PLAIRE CHAIPHET

Thailand has been in control of a military government for quite some time and the long overdue general election has been repeatedly delayed; whilst the recent death and funeral of the beloved 9Th Thai king deeply affected all Thais it diverted attention from these issues and affected the whole country not just emotionally but also economically.

The collection honours the hard work the king had done to stop poverty and homeless but also highlights the issues which concern its people and uses the rich culture and heritage through the medium of a dystopian science fiction film.

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POPPY FULLER

Drawing on her initial theme of magic, she expanded to a more abstract approach as her work progressed. Focusing on elements such as transformation, distortion of reality and secret knowledge allowed her to express her research in a more individual way. Graduations in colour, obscured patterns and glitches all contribute to the illusive mood of her designs.

The concept behind her final outcomes were that they were talismanic fabrics, with specific protective elements woven into their design. It was important for her to capture the sense of mystery from her research while creating a collection that was still sophisticated and new.

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PRAVJOT SAMBHI

Classic beauty is no longer adored, imperfections and the bravery to show them are treated as a symbol of uniqueness and of a well-defined personality. The media portrays ideals telling us who, what and how we should be. Pravjot wanted to explore imperfection in our daily lives focusing on textures, colour and silhouettes. She turned this negative view and embraced it into something of beauty.

During the research stage of the concept, she had looked at model Winne Harlow, who has Vitiligo which is a skin pigmentation caused by lack of melanin pigment in the skin. The designer was enticed by Winnie Harlow’s beauty and how she embraced herself in society.

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QIQI ZHANG

Qiqi Zhang graduated from the Fashion BA course from Kingston University in 2017. Zhang has been very passionate about introducing traditional cultural elements into contemporary pieces, elevating the traditional designs by injecting a dramatic element.

Zhang aims to break the boundaries of gender recognition, and at the same time, creating fashionable pieces focusing on practicality for everyday use.

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QIWEI JIANG

In Qiwei's A/W 2018 Collection, Claude Cahun's work formed a major part of her inspiration. The key concept was developed from two main characteristics incorporated in Cahun's work.

Firstly, it is Cahun's photography, the way how she embraced different personas with distinct characters, using it as a tool to break through the traditional definition and barrier between the two genders, at the same time, blurring the line between masculinity and femininity.

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QI WU

Qi Wu found inspiration for her collection through quirky, chunky objects from all over the world and was captivated by Kintsugi, an ancient craft skill. On her travels, Qi would buy different items in a variety of countries and would use them to decorate her living spaces. She then decided that if these items can be used to decorate her house then why shouldn’t she use them to decorate herself and give them multiple purposes.

Qi Wu didn’t like the idea of old things becoming abandoned. The potential and fascinating aspects of certain items can be discarded so easily in the rapidly developing modern society that we live in.

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REBECCA ARMSTRONG

Rebecca Armstrong’s Graduate Collection, Shimmering and Dirty, is heavily influenced by 1990s fashion, taking inspiration from the work of photographers such as Corinne Day and Juergen Teller. These photographers pioneered a new kind of aesthetic in the 1990s that depicted female subjects in realistic terms, often labelled ‘raw’ due to their use of harsh lighting and lack of retouching. Their work in the fashion industry was pivotal to the re-evaluation of unachievable standards of beauty and poise previously dictated by mainstream publications and helped to open up a dialogue regarding the dissolution of normative ideas on the presentation of women and femininity in fashion.

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REBECCA HOLMES

Rebecca set the mood by incorporating her own experience and stories as part of an initial concept, such as foreign travel, for example the concept for her collection was inspired by a visit to the ‘Kunglia Slotten’ or Royal Palace in Stockholm, Sweden. The overly ornate and magnificent state rooms of the palace oozed luxe and excess; colour coordinated interiors in regal reds and greens and hanging with tapestries were edged in an overabundance of gold.

Her design process alway starts at the knitting machine; swatching inspired by research further into the mood set. She then bring swatches to a stand or photograph for collage and sketching.

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RHIANNON LEWIS

Stereotypical references have labelled the women of society with what is expected of a female. Rhiannon used this as her main tool for inspiration. The equality of the sexes and how gender ideals have been developed link feminine qualities such as body image and beauty to a feminine role.

Rhiannon wanted to use fashion to change this strongly controversial view within society and refigure the image of the feminine gender ideal. This would not only be determined on the history and culture but also the activities of new fashion trends. These show how feminism has evolved from the history of women’s rights to the influences of the male form and sportswear.

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ROMAN SERRA

Serra’s interpretation of Against Nature sees a female protagonist, disgusted with modern society, flee to an isolated manor, decorated in a world of her own creation. In the story At Her Majesty’s Pleasure, which accompanies the collection, it maps out a day in her life.

From rising from her slumber, tending to her garden and creatures, to an offering to Le Sacre Coeur. The tale sees the conceptual embodiment of her overly stimulated environment become part of her body, dressing it for every occasion of her day.

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ROSEY NORMAN

Rosey Norman’s collection was inspired by the rich, luscious textures and colours of traditional still life paintings. This contrasted with the comforting and traditional qualities of pub decor. By contrasting these two traditional and conservative aesthetics, the collection was created in the aim to be more contemporary; creating new from the old.

During the development of the collection the silhouette was drawn from sleepwear throughout history, returning to the initial concept of comfort, and also the silhouette emerged from the fabric techniques and the best way to maximise the rich textures.

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RUTH WILLIAMS

The collection explores the relationship with the clothes we wear and the sense of protection they give us. This originated from questioning the role clothing plays in everyday life. In the most basic sense, clothing protects us from the elements and keeps us warm and safe. But it also holds a strong emotional attachment.

Ruth plays with mixing functional clothing and objects such as sportswear and tents and the traditional art of knitting.

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SARA CHYAN

Jewellery is an object that carries more than just an intrinsic significance, for it is not merely an ornament but also a medium for expressing one’s individuality.

In this project, Sara chose to use gallium and bismuth because she believes these two metallic materials possess symbolic attributes that can be employed to reflect the emotional state of the wearer. This is inspired by her obsession with heat, exploring the possibility of using temperature to assess one's emotional state.

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