DESIGN PROCESS

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OLIVIA MAILEY

Olivia used her abstract photography as the key development when it came to designing her collection. By capturing the uncontrollable reactions triggered during physical and chemical changes she aimed to use her photography to spark a vivid colour palette, pairing pops of citrus tones with translucencies.

Initially inspired by David Mcleod’s 3D digital illustrations that represent movement and fluidity. The synthetic surfaces in Mcleod’s abstract compositions used in the IBM Outthink campaign illustrate the transition between different states of matter such as liquids, solids and gases. The idea of distortion emerges as surfaces combine creating an entrancing visual experience.

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PALOMA ALARCON

Throughout the years it has become noticeable that culture tends to have an influence on the way individuals experience and perceive life. Paloma has always had a profound admiration for Peru, its culture and its people.

Being bought up in Lima, the capital of Peru, developed her interest and admiration of their architecture and textile manipulation. Their colourful layered houses and diverse historical locations such as Macchu Picchu and Chan Chan provide meaningful illustrations of ancient art.

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PENG YU WANG

Inspired by the way insects are constantly renovating and breaking their own inherent patterns in order to become brand new, vivacious and beautiful beings, Peng Yu focused on breaking original lifestyles when it came to creating his collection.

Moving on from this, Peng Yu began observing himself and how he immerses himself into the world, and more importantly, into a chaotic society. Through this he learnt who he wanted to be and how to achieve that goal.

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POPPY FULLER

Drawing on her initial theme of magic, she expanded to a more abstract approach as her work progressed. Focusing on elements such as transformation, distortion of reality and secret knowledge allowed her to express her research in a more individual way. Graduations in colour, obscured patterns and glitches all contribute to the illusive mood of her designs.

The concept behind her final outcomes were that they were talismanic fabrics, with specific protective elements woven into their design. It was important for her to capture the sense of mystery from her research while creating a collection that was still sophisticated and new.

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PRAVJOT SAMBHI

Classic beauty is no longer adored, imperfections and the bravery to show them are treated as a symbol of uniqueness and of a well-defined personality. The media portrays ideals telling us who, what and how we should be. Pravjot wanted to explore imperfection in our daily lives focusing on textures, colour and silhouettes. She turned this negative view and embraced it into something of beauty.

During the research stage of the concept, she had looked at model Winne Harlow, who has Vitiligo which is a skin pigmentation caused by lack of melanin pigment in the skin. The designer was enticed by Winnie Harlow’s beauty and how she embraced herself in society. Winne is now one of the most recognised faces on the international fashion scene and a vocal advocate of body confidence.

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QIWEI JIANG

In Qiwei's A/W 2018 Collection, Claude Cahun's work formed a major part of her inspiration. The key concept was developed from two main characteristics incorporated in Cahun's work.

Firstly, it is Cahun's photography, the way how she embraced different personas with distinct characters, using it as a tool to break through the traditional definition and barrier between the two genders, at the same time, blurring the line between masculinity and femininity.

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QIQI ZHANG

Qiqi Zhang graduated from the Fashion BA course from Kingston University in 2017. Zhang has been very passionate about introducing traditional cultural elements into contemporary pieces, elevating the traditional designs by injecting a dramatic element.

Zhang aims to break the boundaries of gender recognition, and at the same time, creating fashionable pieces focusing on practicality for everyday use.

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QI WU

Qi Wu found inspiration for her collection through quirky, chunky objects from all over the world and was captivated by Kintsugi, an ancient craft skill. On her travels, Qi would buy different items in a variety of countries and would use them to decorate her living spaces. She then decided that if these items can be used to decorate her house then why shouldn’t she use them to decorate herself and give them multiple purposes.

Qi Wu didn’t like the idea of old things becoming abandoned. The potential and fascinating aspects of certain items can be discarded so easily in the rapidly developing modern society that we live in.

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REBECCA HOLMES

Rebecca set the mood by incorporating her own experience and stories as part of an initial concept, such as foreign travel, for example the concept for her collection was inspired by a visit to the ‘Kunglia Slotten’ or Royal Palace in Stockholm, Sweden. The overly ornate and magnificent state rooms of the palace oozed luxe and excess; colour coordinated interiors in regal reds and greens and hanging with tapestries were edged in an overabundance of gold.

Her design process alway starts at the knitting machine; swatching inspired by research further into the mood set. She then bring swatches to a stand or photograph for collage and sketching.

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RHIANNON LEWIS

Stereotypical references have labelled the women of society with what is expected of a female. Rhiannon used this as her main tool for inspiration. The equality of the sexes and how gender ideals have been developed link feminine qualities such as body image and beauty to a feminine role.

Rhiannon wanted to use fashion to change this strongly controversial view within society and refigure the image of the feminine gender ideal. This would not only be determined on the history and culture but also the activities of new fashion trends. These show how feminism has evolved from the history of women’s rights to the influences of the male form and sportswear.

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ROSEY NORMAN

Rosey Norman’s collection was inspired by the rich, luscious textures and colours of traditional still life paintings. This contrasted with the comforting and traditional qualities of pub decor. By contrasting these two traditional and conservative aesthetics, the collection was created in the aim to be more contemporary; creating new from the old.

During the development of the collection the silhouette was drawn from sleepwear throughout history, returning to the initial concept of comfort, and also the silhouette emerged from the fabric techniques and the best way to maximise the rich textures.

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RUTH WILLIAMS

The collection explores the relationship with the clothes we wear and the sense of protection they give us. This originated from questioning the role clothing plays in everyday life. In the most basic sense, clothing protects us from the elements and keeps us warm and safe. But it also holds a strong emotional attachment.

Ruth plays with mixing functional clothing and objects such as sportswear and tents and the traditional art of knitting.

By taking inspiration from tents, sportswear and a beloved knitted jumper, the collection is designed to question our practical needs and explore the emotional attachment we have with our clothing.

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SHANNON LOUISE

Shannon Louise’s collection has captured the harsh reality of bullying, focusing on cyber bullying as it is growing with todays society on social media. Demonstrating that it is just as important as any other social and political discourse. She is wanting to change the globals perception of this accepted behaviour, which causes serious mental and physical health issues.

Taking the deconstructed, anti-fashion and activism inspiration from Vivienne Westwood, Katharine Hamnett and Martin Margiela she created an iconic sentimental showcase of art using fashion as the platform. she is also using her collection to fundraise for ‘Ditch the Label’, the largest anti-bullying organisation in the UK.

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SOHYEON PARK

Sohyeon's father became the subject of this collection. He was a prime example of life in Korea in the 1970´s. When people learn and gain knowledge from life experiences, they then pass it down on to their children. This is what Sohyeon wanted to represent through this collection, the fashion knowledge learnt from his father that now she wants to represent.

This is what Sohyeon wanted to represent through this collection, the fashion knowledge learnt from his father that now she wants to represent. As a result, an element stimulating people’s nostalgia affects sustainable fashion. Consequently the project provides the evidence based on zeitgeist theory.

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SARA CHYAN

Jewellery is an object that carries more than just an intrinsic significance, for it is not merely an ornament but also a medium for expressing one’s individuality.

In this project, Sara chose to use gallium and bismuth because she believes these two metallic materials possess symbolic attributes that can be employed to reflect the emotional state of the wearer. This is inspired by her obsession with heat, exploring the possibility of using temperature to assess one's emotional state.

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SARAH GARFIELD

The main theme of Sarah’s collection was revisiting her 13-year-old self, trying to be an Emo Goth Kid and rebelling from her Eastern European Jewish heritage. What sparked the idea for this concept was when she visited Israel, and learnt to appreciate her Jewish identity not through religion, but through the arts and culture.

It wasn’t just the late 90’s trend of visible underwear that inspired Sarah, but also the layering of sports bras under vests than many young women wear today, as they fit workouts with their busy lives.

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SHAMIMA MUSARRAT

Shamima’s collection ‘Conflicted Heritage’ focuses on the inner struggles that exist within all of us in various aspects of our lives, which shape us to be the individuals we are. This particular project explores her own conflicting thoughts and emotions that arise out of a need to construct an identity that considers all of the flavours of her different cultures.

Shamima is a British-born, Bangladeshi Muslim and very often the values of these different identities can clash with one another, meaning mixing together the aspects of each culture is perceived as a paradox.

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STEVE JIN

Steve Jin's capsule collection titled ‘Between Solidity and Fluidity’ is a work of self-reflection. In order to discover the persona behind the pieces, one needs only to look at the pieces themselves. Steve likes to describe himself as a clean person.

He likes to be tidy and organised yet he revels in small explosions of intricate details, a fine juxtaposition of structure and chaos. By adding an effeminate touch such as flower embroidery acting as decorative accents on a palette of periwinkle blues and blush pink, the collection alluded to the 70s era; and the whole of it, a coming together of the ‘free-spirit’ and the ‘neat freak’.

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XIAOQIAN SHAO

During Xiao Qian's studies in BA Fashion Design at the University for the Creative Arts, she became fascinated with the knitting wear industry. As one of the important sectors in the manufacturing industry, it's constantly evolving with new materials, styles of knitting and machines being introduced. Enraptured by the different types of knitting machines, ideas came flooding to her.

These structures, large in their size and their power, can be fatal. At the same time, these specific machines, overwhelming as they are, are able to produce fine and delicate material. the movements of the machine's intricacies and the synthesis of two discrepant materials, cold hard metal and soft malleable fibres became the inspiration to her collection.

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XIAOQING LIU

Xiaoqing Liu focused on the relationship between solid and liquid. The texture, structure and colours of the opposite materials reflect a variety of moods, which is what Liu based her collection on.

Liu was inspired by these diverse matters in the world as they exist in every aspect of our day to day lives. In order to understand what they demonstrate to each individual it was important to explore their materiality.

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XIAO ZHU CHEN

Dubbed “Little Prince” (after the famed fable of childhood innocence suitable for all ages with its underlying philosophical treatise) there is no better name for Xiao Zhu’s first collection, which probes into the fragile friction between adulthood and childhood perception.

Through the view of both lenses, her designs take inspiration from kid’s drawings and childhood toys reinvented for adult appropriate dress. Bright, vivid colours were selected as backdrops to playful prints, building block inspired shapes and childlike scribbles. LEGO pieces were used to create whimsical accessories such as sunglasses, handbags and hats whilst some pieces were simultaneously applied as embellishments.

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YANA ISTOMINA

Inspired by the visual aspect of physical changes that occur with time, Yana’s collection focus on wrinkles and the body’s shape. Her work is based on her personal feelings provoked by the ageing process of her own skin and the anticipation of its future changes.

According to Yana’s research there are two main opinions formed by social norms as well as personal feelings. One of them is positive: age is viewed as something to be proud of, as a testimony of valuable experiences and the visible part of our personality.

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YEHUA FAN

Yehua took primary inspiration from three elements: Rococo, Mari Antoinette and Crinoline. His collection mainly consists of oversized black suits, ruffled see-through blouses and white crinolines. Most importantly, he considers crinoline to be crucial in his collection for its resemblance with a birdcage, a symbol of limitation on absolute freedom. His collection had a focal point: the total self-liberation from negative feelings or opinions that people had on him, and the need to be sociable in order to blend in with the rest of the society. At first, the disrespectful attitudes received from many others had made Yehua feel slightly uneasy, and maybe even marginally upsetting.

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YINGI GOMA

Waterside boy AW18- The collection draws inspiration from a street hawker who carries all kinds of goods on his body, convincing car riders to buy from him. The collection captures her environment and lifestyle.

There is an interesting use of text, proportions, shapes and fabrication. There is a mix of unusual garment fabrics such as tech net fabric, plastic fabric and hessian. Cotton, linen and woven fabrics are used to represent both the hardship and casual appearance of Waterside boy.

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YU CHING SHEN

“LOVE” a topic that has been heatedly dissected and debated and has become a never-ending source of enquiry, a subjective emotion that has been time again in pop-culture, sociology, psychology… As Plato and Socrates saw it, love was a mental disease, echoed by Haddaway’s infamously catchy song, ‘What is Love? Baby don’t hurt me’.

Yu Ching Shen, a Taiwanese designer, also reflects these realistic sentiments. During her studies at Kingston University for her Fashion MA course, she focussed heavily on textiles research, namely the concept of communicating emotions through textiles. Choosing the emotive ‘love’, Yu-Ching uses different textiles to exemplify her definition of what love is.

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ZEXI YU

Zexi Yu is redefining menswear. Her graduate collection, ‘Dandy In His Garden’, received a magical makeover via dazzling designs embroidered with flowers. Inspired by tailoring and corsetry history, each piece translates an approachable feel.

Yu enhanced her garments through complex lining and shoulder pad silhouettes. This allowed her to create innovative designs that were further heightened through skilful tailoring.

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